The Relationship Between Packaging & Exclusive Products

There is an indelible relationship between exclusive items and the packaging that they come in. The bling factor is accentuated by good packaging. When a woman goes shopping in New York, London or Paris, she wants those new shoes, dress or handbag to be encased inside a carry bag emblazoned with the name of the exclusive store in which she has just purchased it. When she confidentially sashays down the boulevard she wants everyone to know that she has bought these ‘to kill for’ designer shoes. The whole shopping experience is complemented by the relationship between packaging and the exclusive product.

The Relationship Between Packaging & Exclusive Products

Inappropriate promotional bags just do not cut it. Imagine being given your thousand-dollar pair of shoes in a supermarket plastic bag. How degrading would that experience be? Would you ever purchase expensive items from that store ever again? No. People complain about packaging, especially those green tinged environmentalists. They bemoan the waste and the loss of trees. But packaging is incredibly psychologically important to the whole shopping thing. We live in a consumer society and consuming is what we do more often than anything else.

If Tiffanys wrapped their jewellery in old newspaper or Chanel just handed you the bottle of perfume and said see you later. If fancy department stores didn’t have signature carry bags and gift wrapping. Where would the exclusive luxury item be left. It would lose its appeal and the shine would come off. Promotional bags are very important to so many sales. In some ways, the small child who plays with the packaging and ignores the present inside has got the right idea. Packaging has an irreplaceable part to play in the whole transaction. It is the post-coitus cigarette, if you like.

The more special an item is, the more fancy packaging it requires. Promotional carry bags, then inside that tissue paper, perhaps, a bow or ribbon and a fancy store card. Textural impact is another consideration, with different paper weights involved in each level of packaging. Stiff cardboard on the outside of the promotional carry bag, lighter papers as you get closer to the exclusive item itself. Like putting your hand into a drawer full of folded silk knickers and feeling your flesh sliding up against the softness. There should be drama in the packaging, a narrative in paper and cardboard telling a story of anticipation, climax and showing off. It is a mini-series in itself.